Domino Events

Alex Apostolou

When certain events propagate into other systems then there is the likelihood of “domino” effects taking place.

Domino effect is a chain reaction that occurs when a small change causes a similar change nearby, which then causes another similar change, and so on in linear sequence. It is typically refers to a linked sequence of events where the time between successive events is relatively small. In RiskView, Domino Event is defined as a Consequence from one event which act as a trigger (Cause) for a different event resulting in new impacts (Consequences).

Domino effects have become increasingly significant in process risk management due to tighter process integration, tighter spatial designs such as offshore facilities and the establishment of large scale integrated production sites consisting of many adjacent production units.

Typical events that can spawn domino events include:

  • Explosion (missiles, overpressure effects, etc.)
  • Fire (pool, jet, fireball or flash fire events
  • Toxic release (gases and liquids)

To apply Domino Event, ensure that the following setting is enabled in your system:

Once that setting is enabled, click on a Consequence within a Bowtie and navigate to the Properties Panel.

Domino Event

Convert the Consequence node to a Domino Event by navigating to the field called “Share as Domino” and selecting on the “Yes” option.
Once completed, you would need to link the Domino Event to a Cause on another bowtie which will result in another top event occurring.

Click on a Cause within the second Bowtie and navigate to the Properties Panel.

Domino Event

Convert the Cause node to a Domino Event by navigating to “Item Options” to the field called “Pathway Item Type” and selecting on the “Domino Event” radio field. Which will result with the following:

Domino Event

Note: Once a Cause is converted to a Domino Event, it will loose its original data.

Choose the appropriate entry and click on . The following will be the final result:

Domino Event

As it can be seen, the frequency of the Consequence from the first event is now linked to the frequency of the Cause for the second event.

Note:

  • You can only create Domino Event when the analysis type is set to Semi-Quantitative or Qualitative (Automatically Calculated).
  • When a Cause is converted to a Domino Event, it will loose its original data.
  • You link one consequence of a bowtie to a cause of another bowtie, not to the Top Event.

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